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Oticon Apps and Accessories

With both the Opn™ Play and Exceed Play, Oticon offers your children two aids that can help “open up their world.” When paired with assistive listening devices or smartphone apps, their world (and their sound environments) can blossom even more. 

To go along with our Technology Spotlight, we’ve been writing a bit more in-depth on the different brands of Oticon pediatric hearing aids. This week, we’re detailing some of their accessories.

Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs)

Many ALD devices act as a microphone or signal booster, which can help create an optimal sound environment for your child and their comprehension.

1. The ConnectClip

The ConnectClip functions as a remote microphone, with the Oticon hearing aid acting as the receiver – perfect for the classroom or after-school activities.

It’s real simple to use, too. All the teacher or speaker has to do is attach the amplifier to their clothing or place it somewhere nearby. The hearing aid will then pick up the signal and your child will be able to hear as if they were standing right next to their desk.

The ConnectClip can also act as a Bluetooth® remote, allowing you or your child to easily and discreetly adjust the aid’s volume or change the programmed settings.

2. Amigo FM Systems

The Amigo FM is an assistive listening device for the classroom that “bridges the distance between teacher and child and significantly improves the signal-to-noise level by sending the teacher’s voice directly to the child’s ears.”

Whereas the ConnectClip is for the child (or the parent), the FM system is installed in and utilized by the school. The teacher or speaker wears a microphone, and a receiver is attached to the child’s aid.

Also keep in mind: “virtually all Oticon BTE models are FM-compatible ‘out of the box.'” The Amigo is fully compatible with most hearing aids and cochlear implants.

Accessories and Apps

1. The Oticon ON App

The Oticon ON app acts like a remote control, making it easy “for older children and parents to monitor and control the hearing aids from a smartphone. With the app, it is possible to check the battery status and adjust program and volume.” There are also handy “find my hearing aid” functions in case your child frequently misplaces their device.

Though there is some overlap between what the ON app can do and what the ConnectClip does, the ON is specifically used for remote control purposes.

2. SafeLine Retention Cord

This cord can be a lifesaver, especially for younger kids who might take out or lose their devices. “Oticon’s SafeLine retention cord lets kids wear their hearing aids while playing sports or running around without compromising safety.” All you have to do is clip it on.

The SafeLine is also made from hypoallergenic materials and comes in two lengths, 17” or 22”. It is compatible with all behind-the-ear (BTE) and miniRITE hearing aids.

What to Buy

Should you go for the personal assistive listening device or talk to your school about installing a classroom-wide FM system? Is the SafeLine really necessary? What else can you do with the app?

You may still have a lot of questions. Please remember, you can always talk to your audiologist or visit the Oticon website directly. Different kids have different needs, and the professionals around you can help your family make the most informed decision.

Always remember that with the right combination, you can help give your child the best possible advantages in terms of both comprehension development and success. Listening doesn’t have to be a chore!

Autumn Hearing, Indoors vs Out

What’s the best thing about autumn? Pumpkin pie? Cooler weather? Maybe Halloween? There is a lot going on between October and December. If you have hearing loss, how can you best navigate the joys of the season? How can you best look after your hearing, indoors vs out?

Outside

Despite the chilly weather, chances are you’ll still be spending a fair amount of time outside. You might be going on long walks, looking at the leaves change, or you might want to take advantage of one of the most popular harvest months and plan some pumpkin or apple picking weekends. There are hayrides, corn mazes, and haunted houses, too.

  • The main thing you want to watch out for is moisture. Chill in the air might turn to water on your aid. Be sure to dry off your device each night, and use a dehumidifier if you have one.
  • The nice thing about cooler temperatures is more pockets, more places to store accessories. So, if you’re out at your local fall fair, be sure to stick some extra batteries or cleaning cloths somewhere handy.
  • Since you survived the summer, by now you should be an expert at navigating sound environments in outdoor elements. But even so, fall means more wind and rustling leaves. There might be a slight period of readjustment needed.

Inside

Fall has a lot going for it, but it also marks the time of year when people start spending longer periods of time indoors. This change — no matter how familiar — can always feel like a bit of a shock.

  • Keep on talking and seeing people. Go to parties and get-togethers. The more you do this, the more you “practice” hearing. Remember the REM mantra: socializing = brain training.
  • If your hearing aid has settings or profiles, they might need readjustment. This time of year — right before winter — is the perfect time to be sure your device is functioning at peak performance. A visit to the audiologist might even be in order.
  • You might be tempted to take your aids out more than usual when you’re home alone, inside and cozy. Don’t! Wearing your aids as much as possible helps both you and your brain.

Halloween

According to some, maybe the best holiday. And who can blame them? Dressing up, going to spooky parties, and canvassing the neighborhood for candy — when else can you do that?

  • If you’re trick or treating, always be sure you or your children are aware of your surroundings. When it gets dark, visibility might be low, and with all the kids on the street, it might be harder than normal to hear the world around you.
  • Decorate your aids! Have fun with your costume and don’t hide your devices. Be careful of bulky masks or ear coverings.
  • “Wear a glow-in-the-dark badge to say you’re deaf/head of hearing.”

Holiday Season

After Halloween, it’s only a few short weeks until Thanksgiving, and then a few more until the December holidays. The weather will be getting colder, and soon you’ll be spending most of your time indoors, away from the chill. But that’s for another blog!

Returning to Class with Hearing Loss

Returning to class with hearing loss can be challenging, so it’s important to prepare your child for the year ahead. But what should you say? How should you say it? How can you appropriately talk to your kids about the start of the new school year?

All good questions.

1. Explain to your child that their hearing aid or device will actively help them learn, that it’s important they do not feel different or disadvantaged in any way.

2. Treat their hearing aid as a cool new device, something to not be ashamed of, but proud to wear. Frame it, maybe, as a cool new bit of technology, a fun piece of jewelry, or a combination of both. It’s not uncommon to see people wearing earbuds or headphones outside of school, and what’s a hearing aid but a more permanent earbud?

Pediatric aids come in a variety of colors, too. If it’s their first or a new device, help them pick one out that best expresses their personality. Encourage customization!

3. Mention the importance of taking care of the aid — how to treat it with care and handle it gently. A couple times a week, consider a cleaning and maintenance routine with them by your side.

4. Tell them to speak up if they’re still having trouble listening or paying attention, that it’s always ok for them to tell their teacher if they can’t hear. Maybe their batteries need to be changed, or something might be wrong with an FM system or your assistive listening device. Possibly, the aid might need a new configuration. The only way to know is for them to say something.

5. Kids adapt quickly. The most important thing is to not attach any stigma or negative connotations to their wearing of hearing aids.

Every year, REM puts out a blog with back to school tips for those with hearing loss, covering everything from the problems they may face to the importance of getting tested by an audiologist as soon as possible (for both social and developmental reasons). For additional information, please see our past blogs on tips for talking to school administration and the importance of classroom acoustics.

Wine – Chocolate – Hearing Loss

Did you know that (a moderate amount of) wine and chocolate can help your hearing? It sounds far-fetched, but according to some researchers, it’s true. Red wine and dark chocolate may help prevent inflammation that causes — in part — noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).

Inflammation damages your sensory perception. If you get sick or have an ear infection, the blood vessels in your ear canal can weaken, and your circulation can slow. Your natural defenses can be compromised, allowing exposure to loud or constant noise to cause more harm.

If wine and chocolate could help prevent this trauma, it would certainly be welcome news. But for all their supposed benefits, keep in mind neither is a miracle food. You shouldn’t trust them to protect you from external noise, and overindulging in either may, in fact, cause active harm. Excessive alcohol, especially, has been shown to hurt both your brain and — as a consequence — your hearing.

REM has written about food’s relationship with hearing before. In that blog, we focused on the correlation between cholesterol and hearing health. We concluded that the healthier the body, the healthier the hearing. The connection between chocolate and wine and protection from NIHL may be a bit more tenuous, but a little bit of either certainly won’t hurt. They might even help.

At the very least, they’ll taste good.

Family Hearing Loss

Living with hearing loss can be a challenge for anyone, but if your household has one or more individuals with hearing difficulty, day-to-day conversation and interaction can sometimes feel insurmountable. So it’s important to know your options.

Hearing aid technology has advanced greatly over the years, and devices are now at the point (depending on the severity of your loss) where speech in noise can be more easily understood, where you don’t have to shout to get the other person’s attention. If you don’t have hearing aids, you might find yourself turning the TV up too loud, getting easily frustrated trying to talk to your family members, or having your family members get frustrated themselves.

Hearing aids are important. They will help. There may still be difficulties, yes, but with the right device, and the right programming, you can find your family’s conversation equilibrium. This is true for homes with single or multiple wearers of hearing aids.

Assistive listening devices — used in conjunction with your aids — can make things even easier. Hypersound, for instance, is an amplification technology that uses directional speakers to focus the sound of your entertainment system. Most aids, such as the Oticon Opn™, also have Bluetooth® technology that allows certain devices to stream directly to your aids. As the technology around us grows, so does our ability to pair them with each another. Hearing aids are no exception.

With conversation and entertainment options covered, what else is there?

There will always be challenges, despite all the solutions available. Be honest and up-front with your loved ones. Let them know what you’re feeling, what you find frustrating, and ask them to tell you the same. If you and others suffer from hearing loss at the same time, not being transparent can compound communication issues. Hearing issues can be hard enough; there’s no need to make them harder.

Be sure to also talk to your audiologist. They may even be able to help counsel you and your family on how to more easily converse and understand one another at home.

Playing in the Snow with Hearing Aids

In a recent blog, we wrote about the dangers of a wet hearing aid, and what you should do if any moisture finds its way inside. We covered prevention tips, as well as sweatbands, dehumidifiers, and Ear Gear protection. But for full-on snow-based fun, we want to add and emphasize a few more points.

Check your warranty

If your aids break, malfunction, or get lost, you want to make sure if and how you’re covered.

Check your protection

Whether you’re wearing earmuffs, hats that cover your ears, or Ear Gear spandex sleeves, you want to know how well they keep out water. Test inside before you leave the house!

Dry your aids

Keep your aids dry, preventatively. Use a dehumidifier nightly, and wipe down your aids with a dry, clean cloth after any outside activity.

Don’t wear them

Only as a last resort, as this goes against our most common advice. But if you’re going outside for a snowball fight or snow angel session, and you know the environment (and there’s no chance of traffic), a couple minutes without aids might be your best bet. Give them to someone you trust.

It doesn’t matter if you’re an adult or a child, playing in the snow can be fun. If you wear hearing aids, just be sure to take extra care they don’t get wet.

Holiday Hearing Around the Table

Whatever your December may involve, we can all agree that it probably includes a lot of sitting around the table and talking to your friends and family. If you have problems hearing, this can often be frustrating.

Though it may be difficult, we recommend telling anyone who might not be familiar with your hearing loss about your needs up front. It will be a lot easier for you and them in the long run. But we also understand that this may be difficult, especially if you find yourself in a bigger group than usual, or if you’re around people you don’t know. In these situations, don’t get frustrated. Pick up what you can, and respond when you’re able. A couple “pardon me”s and your companions might get the idea without your ever having to tell them.

For smaller gatherings, try to place yourself at the center (location-wise) of any conversation you want to hear. Too far at one end of the table or room, and you may run into difficulty. Quiet backgrounds are always best, though even in the most muted surroundings, there’s always the risk of too much ambient noise. The hardest part about social gatherings are the unknowns.

The Better Hearing Institute has a good, practical list for those persons without hearing loss, and it’s all about accommodation. If you know a guest has a hearing issue, be attentive, speak clearly, and face the person when talking or addressing him or her. If the event is at your house, “keep the room well lit. Providing good lighting will make it easier for those with hearing loss to see facial expressions and the mouths of those speaking.”

Like we said up top, there’s no shame in telling everyone that you need to hear clearly and comfortably. If people know, they’ll often be more than happy to create an accessible atmosphere for both you and your family. And remember, if you have them, always wear your hearing aids. Be sure they’re working and clean before any holiday party, and bring extra batteries just in case.

Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

Hearing loss doesn’t always have to be from noise. Exposure to high levels of sound over an extended period of time may be a leading cause, but there are many others. Aging, genetics, and head injury can all lead to hearing difficulty, as can autoimmune inner ear disease.

Autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) “occurs when the body’s immune system attacks cells in the inner ear.” These cells are often mistaken for a virus, bacteria, or foreign object. AIED is rare, but not unheard of.

Symptoms include progressive, sudden hearing loss over a period of a couple months. Hearing is often replaced by tinnitus, and dizziness and balance issues are not uncommon. Loss can start in one ear, then move to both. Although AIED can happen to anyone, a high incidence of cases are seen in people with Meniere’s disease, which is an inner ear disorder marked by “recurring episodes of vertigo.”

Diagnosis is often a challenge, as there are no specific tests. Underlying causes can include lupus, multiple sclerosis, and even gout, all autoimmune diseases that can relate to AIED. Treatment sometimes includes steroids and the use of hearing aids.

Always talk to your doctor and audiologist if you notice any increase in hearing difficulty.

TBI and Hearing Loss

Brain Injury Symptoms

The past couple of years have seen a rise in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) awareness, perhaps due to their prevalence in both professional and junior-league sports. But did you know, brain injuries can also affect hearing?

Though hearing difficulties after a head injury are not a given (and can’t be relied on to definitively diagnose TBI), any occurrence or increase in hearing loss should be noted and treated. TBI hearing loss can affect the outer, middle, or inner ears, and range in length (short vs. long term) and severity. Tinnitus sometimes results, as does hyperacusis (sensitivity to sound), or Meniere’s syndrome (an incurable and “excessive pressure in the chambers of the inner ear”).

Other TBI symptoms can be moderate or severe, and can include everything from problems with attention, concentration, and vision to “difficulties with interpretation of touch, temperature, [and] movement.” Recognizing warning signs of head injuries is something every parent or teacher should be able to do

Hearing Loss Treatment

Treatment of hearing loss concurrent with that of brain injuries can be tough, as symptoms can overlap. According to the Hearing Review, these symptoms can be “mistaken for PTSD, mental health issues, and cognitive deficits.” If serious enough, long-term management may include hearing aids or auditory processing therapy.

If you notice any instance of hearing loss, you should always check with your primary care physician, who will refer you to an audiologist. With their help, you can come up with a plan to help manage your loss.

If you suffer any blow to the head, or play regular contact sports, its always a good idea to talk with your doctor, as well — even if you don’t have any symptoms. The long-term effects from both TBI and CTE (a degenerative brain disease seen in those with a history of repetitive brain trauma) can be debilitating.

REM has written about TBI before. Don’t hesitate to check out our past blogs, such as TBI and tinnitus and Going Back to School with TBI.

National Audiology Awareness Month

October is National Audiology Awareness Month. What does that mean? What can you do? How can you help spread awareness?

Do a Google search, and you’ll find half a dozen calls to action from a variety of different hearing education resources. The American Academy of Audiology, for example, asks hearing professionals to take charge locally and dedicate time during October 1-5 (“Public Awareness Week”) to “rally with your colleagues,” while Cochlear Americas seeks stories from the experts, hoping to inspire and teach.

Healthy Hearing, on the other hand, lays out the facts for the non-professional. They highlight the importance of not only hearing tests, but the importance of audiology assessments:

“Audiologists have a valuable and varied role in treating the hearing health of people of all ages, from the very young to the very old. They not only perform hearing evaluations and fit hearing aids, but also treat noise induced hearing loss, ear infections, trauma and damage to inner ear and eardrum due to illness or ototoxic medications.”

In line with Healthy Hearing, the NIDCD has a dedicated website to help inform the consumer, especially concerning adolescent hearing loss. This is a great resource for parents and teachers.

Finally, REM has some tips for how you can help with National Audiology Awareness Month:

  1. Spread the news about hearing loss prevention, which is a big part of any audiologist’s job.
  2. Find your favorite resources. In addition to the websites listed above, REM’s own blog — covering a variety of topics over the course of several years — might prove helpful.
  3. Encourage ear protection when exposed to loud noises.
  4. Get an app that monitors noise levels in the world around you.
  5. Realize that everyone over 55 deserves a hearing assessment*.

There’s lots you can do to help this coming October!

*The purpose of this hearing assessment and/or demonstration is for hearing wellness to determine if the patient(s) may benefit from using hearing aids. Products demonstrated may differ from products sold. Test conclusion may not be a medical diagnosis. The use of any hearing aid may not fully restore normal hearing and does not prevent future hearing loss. Testing is to evaluate your hearing wellness, which may include selling and fitting hearing aids. Hearing instruments may not meet the needs of all hearing-impaired individuals.