DYSLEXIA AND TECHNOLOGY

Lots of exciting things are available now for children with Dyslexia. A recent research study was performed for one year with a group of children with Dyslexia using the Oticon Star FM system every day during class time. When compared to their peers that did not use the system the children using the Star had significant improvements in their reading abilities especially with their phonemic awareness skills.

 

Another interesting development is the use of the Kindle Fire and the ability of the child to use audio books and switch between reading, listening, or immersed reading where they can do both.

How the Amazon Kindle Can Help the Dyslexic Reader

AMPLIFICATION FOR CHILDREN WITH NORMAL HEARING

Schafer et al (2014) evaluated 12 children with essentially normal hearing. The children were ages 6 to 11 years, and presented with a multitude of disorders including auditory processing disorders (APD), listening problems, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), language disorders, intellectual disability, and specific language impairment (SLI).

 

All children were fitted with bilateral FM receivers and small, open domes. Real-ear fitting and verification was carried out in accordance with Academy recommended procedures using desired sensation level (DSL) and some modifications (detailed in the article).

In essence, the study supports fitting these children using the Academy FM System real-ear fitting protocol to assure an appropriate FM system fitting for children with normal hearing. “The children in this study showed substantially better speech recognition and comprehension when using the FM system…” and they reported listening comfort while listening in a background of noise.

For More Information, References, and Recommendations
Hall JW, Johnston KN, John AB, Kreisman NV, Crandell CC. (2010) Multiple Benefits of Phonak Edulink Use By Children With Auditory processing Disorder (APD).
Johnston KN, John AB, Kreisman NV, Hall JW, Crandell CC. (2009) Multiple benefits of Personal FM System Use By Children With Auditory Processing Disorder (APD). International Journal of Audiology 48:371-383.
Kuk F. (2011) Hearing Aids For Children with Auditory Processing Disorders? Seminars in Hearing 32(2):189-195.
Schafer EC, Traber J, Layden P, Amin A, Sanders K, Bryant D, Baldus N. (2014) Use of Wireless Technology for Children with Auditory Processing Disorders, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and Language Disorders. Seminars in Hearing 35(3):193-205.

 

CONCUSSIONS AND AUDITORY PROCESSING

Sports Related Concussions and Auditory Processing Disorders November 11, 2011.

In the News Turgeon et al (2011) report approximately 1.6 to 3.8 million potential traumatic brain injuries per year in the United States. The authors compared the auditory processing (AP) abilities of 16 university athletes. Eight athletes had previous concussions; eight had no history of concussion.

All presented with normal hearing and none of the athletes had a history of tinnitus, hearing loss, attention deficit disorder, or neurologic or psychiatric disorders. AP ability was assessed with the Frequency Pattern Sequence Test, the Duration Pattern Sequence Test, the Synthetic Sentence Identification Test, and the Staggered Spondaic Word Test.

All “non-concussed” athletes (n=8) scored within normal limits on the AP tests. Of the concussed athletes (n=8), five presented with deficits on one or more of the AP tests. The authors note, consistent with previous studies, that concussions can lead to AP deficits, despite intact and normal auditory detection results. They note that additional studies regarding concussions might explore “the possible relationship with cognitive factors, such as memory and attention.”

For More Information, References, and Recommendations
Dawes P. (2011) The SCAN-A in Testing for Auditory Processing Disorder in a Sample of British Adults.
International Journal of Audiology 50:107-111. Fey ME, Richard GJ, Geffner G, Kamhi AG, Medwetsky L, Paul D, Ross-Swain D, Wallach GP, Frymark T, Schooling, T. (2011)
Auditory Processing Disorders and Auditory/Language Interventions: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review. Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools 42:246-264. Key APF, Porter HL, Bradham T. (2010)
Auditory Processing Following Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implantation—A Pediatric Case Study Using Event Related Potentials. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology 21(4):225-238. Moore DR, Cowan JA, Riley A, Edmondson-Jones AM, Ferguson MA. (2011)
Development of Auditory Processing in 6- to 11-Year-Old Children. Ear & Hearing 32(3):269-285. Turgeon C, Champoux F, Lepore F, Leclerc S, Ellemberg D. (2011)
Auditory Processing After Sport-Related Concussions. Ear & Hearing 32(5): 667-670.

MOM TO 2 POSH LIL DIVAS: RHYMING ON THE GO: A PLAY TO LEARN PHONICS GAME

I am always trying to “sneak” learning into our day that requires no prep or set-up and only take a few spare minutes time.

Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas: Rhyming On the Go: A Play to Learn Phonics Game

 

LISTENING TRAINING FROM LINGUISYSTEMS

http://www.linguisystems.com/itemdetail.php?itemid=10474

IPHONE APP TO STRENGTHEN DICHOTIC LISTENING

What you can do with it:

  1. Discover where your brain processes language
  2. Test your selective attention abilities
  3. Take part in a global field experiment and help us find out more about how the brain works
  4. Test yourself and your friends and family

http://dichoticlistening.com/